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them recover. bill: also president obama's budget plan taking a bit of a heat for new taxes on middle class. that wasn't supposed to be the? how much families are supposed to pay. martha: there is the scene in denver. what a morning commute in lakewood, colorado. they're making it a slow-go. it is may next week, right? we'll be right back. the farmers' market. maybe another headache will get in the way. maybe you'll have some friends over for dinner. maybe you'll have a migraine. if you have migraines with 15 or more headache days a month, you're living a maybe life. and you may have chronic migraine. but knowing this thing you're going through has a name means knowing you can find treatments that are right for you. go to mychronicmigraine.com to find a headache specialist. and don't live a maybe life. bill: rock concert taking on a whole new meeting. watch this guy. witnesses report seeing a flash more than 250 miles away, that is the stage of the concert, behind stage right, boom. astronomers estimate the object was eight inches across only when it entered the atmosphere. that there
of these proposals would give to our children more taxes, more spending and neither ever reaches balance. there is only one proposal, the house budget, that would instead give to our children a balanced budget and a brighter future of freedom and opportunity. now is the time to choose the budget that reflects our american values. mr. speaker, the american people and future generations of americans deserve a balanced budget. i thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. hoyer, for five minutes. mr. hoyer: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman. preliminary, however to my remarks, i want to say i thank the gentleman for my -- the previous speaker for his remarks and to say i would hope that the senate, having passed a budget, we having passed a budget, the president submitting a budget, that we will now, hopefully as soon as this week, go to conference so that we might discuss the differences and get that budget to which t
, because if i owe $2,000 to you guys on my income taxes, do you guys say you can pay off a little at a time and then pay the rest of over a long time without being penalized? that is garbage. host: congress man? guest: there's a provision, if i'm not mistaken, if there are back taxes due, the people beyond $2,000 that is the feet that is being required in order to help pay for the processing of individuals, that will also be demanded as well. two-sided sort. -- sword. many of these undocumented workers in various industries in this country pay into a great deal of federal taxes, whether it is deducted for their payroll for social security, fica, etc., with no opportunity of ever retrieving or utilizing that tax, because they are prohibited from taking any federal program. also, one of the areas in which there will be some consternation is the fact that even though they have a work visa and are working toward a permanent status, all public benefits will be denied to 11 million people that qualify for this program. host: on twitter -- guest: yes, and parts of the criteria is going to be exact
, cutting spending in the tax code, and then i think it also keeps our promises to people to seniors who worked hard their whole life and want to nothing more than a secure retirement. and to our veterans to 0 who we made promises as they donned the uniform and fought for our country. >> host: what about the issue of changed cpi. . >> guest: i start with a basic notion that social security has enci ad itbutedp our shben ttal n part of the discussion. certainly we need to be concerned about the long-term solvent sei of social security but again when retirement security is question mark for so many families. i don't think it should be on the table during this part of the discussion during the budget resolution. look at the real contributors to our deficit and debt as we try tackle those challenges. >> host: two final questions before we go to calls. callers are ready. this is another article during an intimate dinner with democratic senators. how come you were left off the list? [laughter] >> guest: i have no idea. [laughter] but i have been very pleased with the president's increase in ou
,000 people arrested each year for marijuana-related offenses. if we tax currently illegal drugs, we could bring in more than $46 billion. two states, colorado and washington, are trying to end the war on drugs by doing what was said long ago. legalize it. warrick wants to allow it to sold and taxed in a way that monitors how alcohol is sold and taxed. it is a little more complicated than that because of a little thing call the federal government. and he is tasked with ill plemting the new law, new law a professor of public policy at ucla and author of "marijuana cost of abuse, cost of control." welcome, mark. you're advising washington state on how to implement their new law. what are you doing? what are you advising? such that the law is implemented and people behave in a way that is responsible? and is not about we want more people to get high but we don't want people who are committing nonviolent offenses to be crimin criminalized? >> right. we don't want hundreds of millions of dollars in washington state going to revenues. i'm not sure what did the report you just quoted, but anybody
to have the same enthusiasm for paying taxes for the education of its college students today than it had during the cold war. >> anybody else? back in the red shirt in the middle here. >> one of the kingpins of hollywood, more behind the seasons, was lou wasserman who seemed to helped his forces to some political efforts. what was his leanings? was he considered to be a lefty, righty, or just a pragmatist. >> the question is about lou wasserman and his political lengs. -- political leanings. richard? >> lou was seniorman was essentially a man defeated to the welfare of universal pictures. that's what he did and how he defined himself. it seems to me that wasserman was in a certain sense value neutral so long as whatever was happening worked to the benefit of his studio and his enterprise, and it was a vast enterprise by the time it was -- it reached full maturity. i don't think he was -- i don't think he was evil man. he was just a guy really tending to business in a very, very, i must say, very effective way. there's no question in my mind at least, that he was the weeding ontrip -- the
looking at the i.r.s. of tax code. you have the north pacific, alaska. >>steve: it should be simple. we're going to go get them. >> think about it. now we own a part of a federal resource. it's been good for us that way. we can lease crab, buy crab, sell a crab. for us, it's been lucrative. but at the same time they do clamp down. every agency has got their fingers in us somehow. >>steve: who is the worst? who is the worst? >> they're all great! they're all great! >>steve: in the next season, i understand you guys face your toughest winter ever; right? there is a downturn? >> it's like groundhog day. it was tough. >>steve: why is that? just an off year? >> he'll say there is a lot of ice. flatout, climate change is an issue and it's impacted all the fisheries, all the seas, everything. incrementally a little at a time. you throw things out of whack a little bit and the whole marine ecosystem starts to shift. but our fisheries are healthy right now. >> it didn't feel like global warming to me, that's all i know. i'm telling you, it was cold. >>steve: of all the reality shows, i think you
in terms of cutting spending. cutting spending in the tax code. then i think it also keeps promises to people, it to those that were part of their whole life and want nothing more than a secure retirement. and our veterans to whom we have made promises as the have donned the uniform and fought for the country. host: what about the issue of chain cpi? guest: i start with the very basic notion that social security has not contributed one penny to the current deficit or debt. table in not be on the this part of discussion. similarly, to be concerned about the long-term solvency of so-so security. urity.ial sec retirement security is a real question mark for many americans. let's look at the real contributors to our deficit and debt as we try to tackle those challenges. and host: two final questions before we go to calls. this is another article from the hill. why were you left off the list of the 12 senators that went to dinner? iest: i have no idea, but have been very pleased with the president's increase -- increase out reach to the senate and a house. that dialogue is essential to m
that covers the entire extent. every one of those had to be eat late taxed. the congress imposed a more onerous, more restrict it from a comma rules that on my ability to move money from ppa to ppa. i have small pdas with not a lot of money but for whatever reason decided there needed to be more over the national intelligence program. the effect of the fy 13 of her rations that did help us in that it allowed us to move money around civic and that the money into the path we are committed to by virtue of the fact were five men in before we got a bill. sowo ba dister t it. a cab structure, did allow new start,t also frommocountschss here was what many at the endf the day and of course the of sequestration was doubled because we had to take it in seven months. iraq i was. ealistic impact. >> that is helpful because it provides more of a context of things we might be able to do. again, we have a macro issue of sequestration can watch everyone recognizes it's in packs on your programs. but i stand legislative authorization not on this committee that the intelligence that could have the skinny
every bill is too big and every deal tends to be today. so for example, like on tax reform, tomorrow i would lower the income tax. if we can compromise on the number i would lower it to 17% tomorrow. just do it. i don't care if people predicted less revenue, less revenue means more revenue in economy. if you in an enormous boost to ththe con and we like under kennedy, like under coolidge and like under reagan when you reduced rates, sometimes you get more revenue. that is because the deal is to be. same with immigration. we make it harder on ourselves are the debt commission, we make it a lot harder to find a deal when it has a thousand moving parts but i think we should go with the things we agree on and boom, boom, boom. it's why the rate -- that's why the public is so upset with us. all the stuff we agree on we won't pass because we say that will be the sweeter for the bigger deal. which we never seem to be able to get to one that break up all these big deals into smaller deals? i tried to pass the stand these a, science and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10